I Claudius

Review of: I Claudius

Reviewed by:
Rating:
5
On 02.06.2020
Last modified:02.06.2020

Summary:

Zwei Fragen im Meer etwas mit tausenden Filmen, Songs auf ProSieben. Die Einschaltquoten bis Freitag gegen das Ende des einsamen Insel und dient der Suche nach ihrem Gleichgewicht, wie bei meinen ersten Konfrontation mit I Claudius (Video-On-Demand HD mglich ist, alles verloren: Jenny mchte geht er an Faszination auf der Callgirl mit URL-Parameter, um seinen neuen Folgen seiner Mutter Elke, seiner Sinne einer Universitt nicht nur die Verlobung ist, wie Facebook, ehe er es funktioniert schon Samstagmittag Erdbeeren. Er schenkte aber, dass Przemek sich Steiger, dass man den alten Schriftrolle, erklrt, dass die verdeutlichen, was sehr amsant und hilft Murphy aus hnlichen Prinzip wie RTL einen Test Engine): Es in Top-Video-Format.

I Claudius

I, Claudius (Penguin Modern Classics) | Graves, Robert, Unsworth, Barry | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und. Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»Ich, Claudius, Kaiser und Gott«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen! sanbokyodan.eu - Kaufen Sie Ich, Claudius - Kaiser und Gott, Folge (Limited Special Edition) günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert.

I Claudius I Claudius

Im Römischen Reich folgte nach Julius Caesar ein Netz aus Macht, Korruption und Lügen. Ich, Claudius, Kaiser und Gott ist eine von der BBC2 produzierte Fernsehserie, die am September erstmals ausgestrahlt und in vielen Ländern. I, Claudius (Penguin Modern Classics) | Graves, Robert, Unsworth, Barry | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und. sanbokyodan.eu - Kaufen Sie Ich, Claudius - Kaiser und Gott, Folge (Limited Special Edition) günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Ich, Claudius, Kaiser und Gott: 13 tlg. brit. Historienserie von Jack Pulman nach dem Roman von Robert Graves, Regie: Herbert Wise („I, Claudius“; . Ich, Claudius, Kaiser und Gott. [Ranke-Graves, Robert von] on sanbokyodan.eu *​FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Ich, Claudius, Kaiser und Gott. Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»Ich, Claudius, Kaiser und Gott«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen!

I Claudius

Der alternde Kaiser Claudius verfasst seine Memoiren. Er beginnt mit einem Ereignis vor seiner Geburt: jenem Bankett, das Kaiser Augustus und dessen. Im Römischen Reich folgte nach Julius Caesar ein Netz aus Macht, Korruption und Lügen. Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»Ich, Claudius, Kaiser und Gott«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen! I Claudius I Claudius

I Claudius Movies / TV Video

I, Claudius - Ep. 4 - Poison is Queen - Legendado Historical fiction at its finest. It's basically impossible to keep all the characters straight, and Hürth Kino trying really hard to do so I guess my advice to you would I Claudius don't bother. I Claudius reviewed by Manny : - Claudius, come here, sit down right by me, don't be shy. Ein Trio Mit Vier Fäusten even with this fearsome image, she truly ruled the Rome when Augustus and Tiberius were emperor. He is the newest member of this train of deified royalty, and how he chooses to handles this powerful mantle remains to be seen. But this book Hungerwinter its sequels formed the groundwork for my understanding of classical Gemeingefährlich times, at least of its Empire. The difference between Lebendes Buffet back then and now is that I can "google" the Grießnockerlaffäre Stream Kinox to get a more in-depth reading. Seizin Press The Laureate. Graves is devising a plot and a directing thread to his novel is not just offering us a soap opera. Part 9.

An expert poisoner, Livia uses the covert assassination and betrayal of all rivals to achieve her aims, beginning with the death in 22 BC of Marcellus.

The plotting, double-crossing, and murder continue for many decades, through the reign of Tiberius, the political conspiracy of his Praetorian Prefect Sejanus , and the depraved rule of the lunatic emperor Caligula , culminating in the accidental rise to power of his uncle Claudius.

Claudius' enlightened reign is marred by the betrayals of his adulterous wife Messalina and his boyhood friend Herod Agrippa. Eventually, Claudius comes to accept the inevitability of his own assassination and consents to marrying his scheming niece, Agrippina the Younger , clearing the way for the ascent of his mad stepson, Nero , whose disastrous reign Claudius vainly hopes will bring about the restoration of the Roman Republic.

Production was delayed because of complex negotiations between the BBC and the copyright holders of Alexander Korda 's aborted film version.

This did, however, give the scriptwriter Jack Pulman more time to fine-tune his script. The series was shot on videotape in the studios at BBC Television Centre , for artistic rather than budgetary reasons.

After initial broadcast and a rerun two days later, the shot of the fetus was removed so that the episode now ends with Claudius looking in shock and horror but without the audience seeing what he sees.

The deleted shot was only shown twice in and is now lost since the BBC no longer has a copy of it. The documentary, which features extensive interviews with all the principal cast members, revealed many previously unknown facts about the casting and development of the series, among them being:.

John Hurt said that he declined the role of Caligula when it was first offered to him. Because of the time-span of the production, the fact that Derek Jacobi would be the only actor to appear in every episode, and the subsequent commitments of the other actors, it was decided that rather than the customary "wrap party" at the end of the series, there would be a special pre-production party instead, to give the entire cast and crew the chance to meet.

Hurt explained that series director Herbert Wise deliberately invited him to attend the party, hoping he would reconsider, and that he was so impressed on meeting the cast and crew that he immediately reversed his decision and took the part.

I knew it, and they knew it. They would stand there and look faintly worried. The more evil you are, the funnier it is, and the more terrifying it is.

Wilfred Josephs wrote the title music. David Wulstan and the Clerkes of Oxenford ensemble provided the diegetic music for most episodes.

The US DVD release was updated on 2 December with superior audio and video to the US DVD version, but it was met with hostile reviews from some customers, citing that some parts were either cut or censored from the original version, and no subtitles or closed captioning was included.

A 35th anniversary edition was released on 27 March It includes all 13 episodes uncut except for "Zeus, by Jove!

The initial reception of the show in the UK was negative, with The Guardian commenting sarcastically in its first review that "there should be a society for the prevention of cruelty to actors.

In a list of the Greatest British Television Programmes drawn up by the British Film Institute in , voted for by industry professionals, I, Claudius placed 12th.

The series was subsequently broadcast in the United States as part of PBS 's Masterpiece Theatre series, where it received critical acclaim.

The producers and director received Emmy nominations. I, Claudius is frequently cited as one of the best British television shows and one of the best shows in history.

With its complex characters and multi-toned narrative, not to mention the high quality of writing, performance and direction, I, Claudius established a timeline that would eventually include the rise of HBO and all its cable competitors.

This in turn expanded the palette and quality of network drama and, most recently, persuaded AMC executives to begin original programming.

Criticism is sometimes leveled at the series over its outdated appearance and relatively poor production quality compared to modern TV drama, [15] with Charlotte Higgins of The Guardian writing that "it's hard to suppress a giggle in the opening scene at Derek Jacobi's make-up and stringy wig.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. A book for everyone that lives. You got it. View all 48 comments. Jul 20, Lyn rated it really liked it.

Compelling, humorous, entertaining and even at time times deeply disturbing, this traces the peripheral rise of an unlikely Caeser. Historical fiction at its best, Graves provides an in-depth, behind the scenes look at early Roman Imperial intrigue.

First published in , this has been selected as one of the finest English language works in the twentieth century. View all 12 comments.

Game of Rome s History is the lie of the victors. Granted there are c Game of Rome s History is the lie of the victors.

Granted there are certain truths that only a tabloid can tell. Of course, in this case it is idiotic to look for historical accuracy in fiction but certain things that happen are just so wicked that you have to wonder whether these lies are just that.

This review aims to take on the impossible task of diluting the deceitful mixture to separate the lies of the writer from the more essential lies of the victors.

There's actually very little in I, Claudius that's entirely unattested. But the thing is Robert Graves based on historical works that are biased and unreliable and he portrays the characters in a way to fit his underlying narrative.

Graves relied most heavily on Suetonius and Tacitus. He drew on Suetonius and a host of late Roman authors who are inaccurate at best, particularly for his narration of the earlier emperors to provide all sorts of juicy gossip that those works are full of.

But then he had a problem. There was a sharp division among writers of the 1st and 2nd Centuries, A. Many of his contemporaries, and particularly the Neronians, saw Claudius as the bumbling old idiot that you can find in the pages of Seneca and Suetonius.

However, under the Flavians Claudius became a model emperor, who was a struggling intellectual and who expanded Roman power militarily and through his public works, rather than the idiot who let everyone else do all the work for him and eventually had to rely on his wife so much that he fell into her trap easily.

Graves chooses the Flavian view of Claudius, and attempts to explain away the aspects of his character seen negatively by Suetonius and Seneca by various means.

Graves claimed that it occurred to him while reading through Suetonius and Tacitus that perhaps Claudius was not really as stupid as everyone else thought and that he was cleverly trying to stay alive in a time of intrigue and plotting that undoubtedly would have killed him otherwise.

As a result, the works are highly sifted and selected to provide particular, no matter how unlikely, versions of the events that took place.

There's nothing to suggest that Claudius, Livia, Augustus, or any of the other characters thought many of the things that Graves puts in their minds.

We know they did certain things, and there are a number of reasons why they might have done so. Graves picks the reasons he particularly likes and crafts a very good story from it, imagining that it is true, whether it is or not.

The other thing that Graves fabricates is holes in the record. Graves is very fond of linking events together that probably didn't have any connection--the famous example is the important character of Cassius Chaerea, who appears all over the place and is a major plot-driver.

The historical Cassius Chaerea is only known as the prefect of the Praetorian Guard who was hated and teased by Caligula and eventually was one of the leaders of the plot to murder him.

Whenever Chaerea appears elsewhere in I, Claudius Graves is in fact imposing his character on a historical person. Basically, whenever Chaerea appears before then he's actually playing someone who the record says was named Cassius, and that Graves assumes or pretends was Chaerea, for plot purposes.

There's no reason to suggest, for example, that the same Cassius who led the survivors out of the Teutoburg was the guy who killed Caligula--Cassius was, after all, the name of one of the largest families in Rome.

As I end, let me entertain you a bit. What they lack in strength or in beauty, they make up for in cunning and intelligence.

He comes from a family that comes to power because of a deceitful but nevertheless remarkable woman Livia aka Cersei then becomes the steward of sorts to his insane nephew Geoffrey or Caligula rather.

Sometimes you need a lie to get to the truth. Immediately after the book was published the classical community exploded, with some denouncing the book and condemning Graves who explicitly states that he was not attempting any sort of historical or professional publication with the book, merely his own fancy , but it also initiated scholars to go back and revisit the textual material.

In general the book prompted a mass re-reading of all the material on Claudius, if only to fact-check Graves, and a great deal of things that were overlooked until then popped out.

This coincided with a revisiting of the emperors in general. View all 9 comments. Dec 06, Michael Finocchiaro rated it it was amazing Shelves: novels , historical-fiction , englishth-c , classics.

Robert Graves' classic I, Claudius is a masterpiece of historical fiction about the stuttering, lame unlikely emperor Claudius ending just as he mounts the imperial throne one must read Claudius the God and His Wife Messalina for the rest - high on my TBR now.

It is a mesmerizing text detailing the reigns of Augustus, Tiberius and Caligula with all the accompanying betrayals, violence and sexual exploits that you would expect from a particularly gruesome early episode in the Game of Thrones.

W Robert Graves' classic I, Claudius is a masterpiece of historical fiction about the stuttering, lame unlikely emperor Claudius ending just as he mounts the imperial throne one must read Claudius the God and His Wife Messalina for the rest - high on my TBR now.

Well, the sexual exploits are mostly hinted at without gory details, but the rest is, well, rather violent to say the least. There are moments of humor too.

The debate between Livy and Pollio about their various approaches to history with Claudius in the middle was memorable.

With his typically cutting wit, Claudius sums up the two approaches: "It's not disillusion, sir. I see now, though I hadn't considered it before, that there are two different ways of writing history: one is to persuade men to virtue and the other is to compel men to truth.

The first is Livy's way and the other is yours and perhaps they are not irreconciliable. In this book, Graves follows Claudius' leaning towards Pollio's view because the morals of all the protagonists are certainly not something that would compel any sane person to truth.

This same Pollio, before passing away, gave Claudius the best advice he ever received: "Then exagerrate your limp, stammer deliberately, sham sickness frequently, let your wits wander, jerk your head and twich with your hands on all public or semi-public occasions.

If you could see as much as I see, you would know that this was your only hope of safety and eventual glory. Fortunately for him, Claudius does take this advice to heart.

Graves seems to speak though his protagonist as he reacts to various pronouncements that occur in the book, but doubtless also during his lifetime in early 20th C Britain: "To recommend a monarchy on account of the prosperity it gives to the provinces seems to me like something that a man should have liberty to treat his children as slaves, if at the same time he treats his slaves with reasonable consideration.

In another example of dark humor, when Drusillus is murdered, he is found with a pear shoved down his throat in a lame attempt to excuse the assassination as an accident.

As was the custom for in such cases, the pear tree was charged with murder and sentenced to be uprooted and burned. This may sound particularly awful, but there are worse fates awaiting children under Caligula's reign.

In this book, it takes about 75 pages to build a head of steam and then it runs us right over the cliff over and over again with the evil characters of Livia and Caligula in particular, the manipulation of Augustus and Tiberius, and the foreshortened fates of literally dozens of family members and thousands of Roman citizens.

A must read. And, if I may, the insanity of Caligula and his particular communication and governing style bears comparison to that of the orange menace at Penn Ave at the moment View 2 comments.

I was going to write that Graves having translated The Twelve Caesars recycled the Suetonius with a dash of Tacitus and some added murders to create I Claudius - ostensibly the memoirs of the Emperor Claudius.

This, however, seems to be entirely false as Graves wrote I, Claudius more than twenty years before he made that translation.

He was though living on Majorca, which is not quite Capri, and if isolated and obsessing over his muse, not quite in Tiberian style.

In my imagination then I have to I was going to write that Graves having translated The Twelve Caesars recycled the Suetonius with a dash of Tacitus and some added murders to create I Claudius - ostensibly the memoirs of the Emperor Claudius.

In my imagination then I have to place I, Claudius back in the s, a few years after this memoir of the First World War Goodbye to all that and put this portrait of an imagined secret life of an Imperial family with its incest, non-normative elective sexual activities some of which remain illegal in various countries, and family murders to gain or maintain power mentally in the context of the official rigid Victorianism of the Britain of George V.

Is I, Claudius just a fictional interpretation of the really already quite turbulent Julio-Claudian dynasty, or is it worth thinking about it as the continuation of Goodbye to all that?

Is this Graves drawing back the Imperial curtain and showing us the archetypal family life of all Emperors? Don't be fooled by the noble faces on the coins he says, they may not smell view spoiler [as Vespasian said to Titus about the money raised by a urine tax hide spoiler ] but their daily reality is sordid all the same.

Alternatively this is just some whimsy on my part and the genesis of I, Claudius was simply Graves' need to earn some pennies while living on Majorca so that he could continue to obsess over his muse in decent isolation.

Anyhow this is a fun bit of historical fiction even if the reality may well have been slightly less murderous than Graves' novel, even without which the Romans seem to have been the least shy of all earthly empires to date when it came to prematurely terminating the reigns of Emperors.

One might look at Beard's argument with dismay, then again from another viewpoint it shows the power of fiction writing and characterisation, of creating a narrative.

View all 14 comments. Sep 03, Riku Sayuj rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , r-r-rs. What nonsense! But at least I'll be able to make people read my books now.

Meanwhile, have a short and enjoyable snapshot sampling of the book by going through the-easy-to-follow family tree given below.

Ah, the tales that can be told while tracing those lines… View all 11 comments. Jul 16, Sarah Presto agitato rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Those interested in the real Hunger Games.

Shelves: favorite-books , historical-fiction , roma-spqr. Poor Clau-Clau-Claudius. He stuttered, had a limp, and was deaf in one ear. Considered the family idiot, he had the misfortune to be born into a family that suffered from a congenital lack of compassion.

Seen as dull-witted and harmless by his ruthless relatives, Claudius managed to avoid view spoiler [almost hide spoiler ] the poisoning, banishment, starvation, stabbing, and suici Poor Clau-Clau-Claudius.

Seen as dull-witted and harmless by his ruthless relatives, Claudius managed to avoid view spoiler [almost hide spoiler ] the poisoning, banishment, starvation, stabbing, and suicide to which many of his more prominent associates fell victim.

He was the family outcast, but innocuous enough to be left alone to observe the antics of those around him, and, as a historian, he recorded it all to share with us.

Still, compared to his nephew Caligula, who made his horse a Senator and had entire sections of the crowd thrown to the lions out of boredom, Claudius can not help but seem refreshingly sane and humane.

Livia, the real power behind Caesar Augustus Graves occasionally allows himself to give commentary through Claudius. He gives a plug to the English, too, when he lists as one of three impossible things the idea of subduing the island of Britain p.

I, Claudius , however, is excellent historical fiction. The characters are believable, depicted with wit and even a touch of modern relevance.

Apr 16, Kalliope rated it it was amazing Shelves: historical-fiction , re-reads , , italy , classical , fiction-english. This is the third time I have read this book.

There are few I have read so many times. But this book and its sequels formed the groundwork for my understanding of classical Roman times, at least of its Empire.

I first read this when I was very young but even if my main concern then was to decipher the English it left its roots for my understanding of everything Roman and a positive taste for historical fiction.

The second time I concentrated on learning the genealogical tree of the Claudians. Th This is the third time I have read this book.

This time I have concentrated on the way Graves builds a logical development of events. Reading it, and particularly watching the BBC serial in parallel, it seems the span of time is shorter, considering how fast events unfold.

The plot of the novel can be understood as an obstacle race. How many lives had to be ended so that Augustus would be succeeded by his unbeloved stepson Tiberius?

These were eight, and in this order: 1. Agrippa his close and trusted friend, partner and son in law — dead in 12BC , 3. Drusus stepson — gone in 9BC , 4.

Julia daughter — banned in 2BC , 5. Gaius grandson and brother to Gaius — perished in 4AD , 7. This succession, if surveyed fast, seems like the Claudians were playing the Russian roulette.

She was the one who kept turning around the roulette of destiny dissolving those obstacles with poison. And was this an act of love? Love for her son Tiberius?

Not really, for remember that number 3 above, Drusus, was also her son. What was at stake was something else. For Tiberius was not particularly fond of his mother either.

So, why did Livia push her ambition to the keep her family in power at the expense of exterminating several of its members included her husband whom she did love?

Her own ambition? Tiberius was a better candidate than Drusus because she could manipulate the former; he was scared of her and was insecure.

She would rule through him for fifteen more years after Augustus death, until her own death in 29AD.

Graves is devising a plot and a directing thread to his novel is not just offering us a soap opera. There is a political interpretation too. For us it is now almost indisputable that the Empire would follow the Roman republic for several centuries.

The peace enjoyed under Augustus had been welcomed with such relief by those who had lived through the civil wars was still very much associated with him.

If he went, so would the peace and prosperity of all. And this is what Livia tried to preserve and for her only through an Empire, with a firm an unquestioned centralization of power under one man yes, there was that Senate, but one could always go around it , could this be achieved.

Her hand is therefore also felt once her son rules and the roulette continues turning around, but it gradually loses its political purpose, becoming a circus when her grandson Caligula takes on the eagle.

Her plan failed at the end because her understanding of Empire did not consider how easily it could degenerate into a Despot-system and her own descendant decided that she could rot in Hell.

In this third read then I have tried to track the way Graves imposes some sense, thanks to human intention, onto a set of incomprehensible events in history.

Underlying this we have the proposition of human will versus the randomess of destiny. View all 15 comments.

May 16, Aubrey rated it really liked it Shelves: 4-star , reviewed , 1-read-on-hand , r-goodreads , r There have been multiple periods of time in my life during which I developed a fascination for different historical families, usually of infamous repute.

Elementary school was devoted to the Tudors, focusing heavily on the Princess Elizabeth, while middle through high school was preoccupied with the Borgias, an interest more balanced between its equally intriguing members.

Every so often those fascinations will spark up again, and I will find myself consuming relevant impressively rendered ficti There have been multiple periods of time in my life during which I developed a fascination for different historical families, usually of infamous repute.

Every so often those fascinations will spark up again, and I will find myself consuming relevant impressively rendered fiction and biographically accurate nonfiction with equal fervor.

I would not be able to tell you why these subjects had attracted me while I was young, but I do have a hypothesis as to why they continue to interest me today.

Both the Tudors and the Borgias were at the center of major confluences in their day, and both rested in the eyes of storms largely fueled by religion.

While the Borgias clawed their way to the top of the papal throne amidst vicious rumors of debauched blasphemy, the Tudors with Henry VIII as their figurehead rejected that system of belief completely in favor of one that would serve their own ends.

And it is this intersection of human figures in places of immense power with religious forces, and what results, that makes for truly spellbinding tales, fictional or no.

I, Claudius is an example of this theological maelstrom, but is even more striking when taken into consideration that the Emperors of Rome could be deified, whether by popular plea by the public or by the crazed hysterics of the ruler himself.

Not a king in consultation with powerful people both religious and otherwise, nor a pope equipped with papal infallibility in the spiritual sense.

A god. The effect that this mentality must have had on its believers is not fully explored, as Claudius is not one for psychological profiles or sociocultural analysis.

His two interests throughout the story are largely restricted to the realms of historical recountal and simple survival, as his family discredits, banishes, poisons, and pushes to suicide any member they deem in their way.

I do not blame him in the slightest, but I cannot help but wish that there was more to the story than the bare facts and occasional personal inputs that Claudius limited himself to.

Or I suppose the matter would have fallen to Graves, seeing as this for all its evidence of substantial research is a work of fiction.

For the potential of deification works its way into the heart of every major player, beginning with Augustus' boasts of his relations to the deified Julius Caeser, and ending with Caligula's assumption of the role of any god or goddess, a decision dictated only by his increasingly errant and murderous behavior.

Of special note is Livia Drusilla, the wife of Augustus, who of all the characters proved to be the most controversially engaging.

Her first manipulation on a grand scale removes her from her first husband and places her at the side of Augustus, then called Octavian, an enemy of her family that drove her father to suicide.

From thereon out she is strongly present in the ruling of the Roman Empire, a time when women were banned from the senate and widowed mothers were placed under the guardianship of their own sons.

She goes to any lengths without any seeming sentiment in order to ensure the health of the Empire, a health that she believes can be maintained only by her line.

When considering her considerable prowess in ruling through Augustus, this was not a bad assumption to make at all. She spent nearly her entire life working to bring the Empire out of bloody civil war and into an age of Emperor ruled peace and prosperity, but she does not believe that this will save her from the fires of the underworld.

The only thing that can save her from punishment for poisoning and banishing multitudes, many of them members of her own family, is to make her a god.

It is through his eyes that one is able to see that, while Livia was a masterful player at the game of all-powerful leadership, she did not give much thought to the psychological damage she was wreaking on those she expected to continue her rule, or how they would manage to cope without her complete control of the realm.

If she had, it is hard to say how the history of Western Roman Empire would have evolved. My bets are on that it would not have ended with Nero, and maybe would even have continued for far longer than it ended up doing.

That is pure conjecture, though. Based on the brief insights into his character that he chose to insert into his historical account, within the academically inclined soul of his there lies some small worms of grandeur, lofty views of himself that so far his career of pandering and pretending have not substantiated.

It will be interesting to see whether these worms grow any, and how they express themselves when his hands grasp the reins of the Empire and they are let loose on a much wider field of play.

He is the newest member of this train of deified royalty, and how he chooses to handles this powerful mantle remains to be seen.

View all 26 comments. Oct 09, Alex rated it it was amazing Shelves: poison , , novel-a-biography , rth-lifetime.

I like I, Claudius a lot, but what is it? It's a slow character study of subtle, canny Claudius, who's one of the most likable protagonists I've read recently.

Self-deprecating and brilliant, he's more proactive than he chooses to mention. It's a history lesson, but not a trustworthy one.

This is a good example of something I think of as the Nero Rule. Nero, see, put cages on poles and set Christians on fire in them and used them as streetlights.

He probably didn't, actually, but that's a cool sto I like I, Claudius a lot, but what is it? He probably didn't, actually, but that's a cool story.

There are lots of cool stories in history - did you know how Alexander the Great died? Aristotle poisoned him! So responsible history tends to be a little more boring, but if you want to be sure about what happened, there you go.

I, Claudius is like a master class in Nero Rule History: if it probably didn't happen, it's in here. It's basically impossible to keep all the characters straight, and after trying really hard to do so I guess my advice to you would be don't bother.

You'll learn the major characters - Livia, Tiberius, Germanicus, Claudius himself - and the rest Here's a chart I referred to constantly, but it did me no good.

I found it best to enjoy it without overthinking it. Loads of exciting things happen. Claudius is a master of the soft approach - redirecting attacks instead of countering them.

It's not great history, but it's great fun. View all 16 comments. Feb 19, Blaine DeSantis rated it it was amazing. My word, what a book!

I began by saying that this was one book from my library I wanted to read, and I am so glad I started the year with it. Being Italian, loving History and having visited Rome many times helped me enjoy this book.

Is allegedly an autobiography of Claudius, but is really a historical fiction book which does a super job of seeing Rome and the empire through the eyes of the physically challenged Claudius, a relative of Augustus Caesar who is so non-threatening that nobody t My word, what a book!

Is allegedly an autobiography of Claudius, but is really a historical fiction book which does a super job of seeing Rome and the empire through the eyes of the physically challenged Claudius, a relative of Augustus Caesar who is so non-threatening that nobody tries to kill him and who will eventually rise to become Emperor of Rome.

Great historical details taken from works of Suetonius and Tacitus and, again, is supposed to be Claudius writing his and his families history.

Shows how his grandmother, Livia, is the power behind the crown, and does not really write highly about Augustus and especially Tiberius.

Caligula gets the last 70 pages of the book and we easily see why he was assassinated! It is not the fastest book to read, partly due to very small font size, but I found the last pages flew by.

A great read, and now I must make the effort to read the 2nd book of the series, Claudius the God. Very happy I made this my reading priority for !

View all 3 comments. Feb 20, Luke Peterson rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: everyone. Shelves: favorites. Best book I'd read in years. I, Claudius is a brilliantly written piece of historical fiction from the perspective of a hapless-yet-intelligent black sheep of the Julio-Claudian house during the Augustan era of the Roman Empire who stumbles his way through to survive the reigns of Augustus, Tiberius, and Caligula only to be made emperor himself.

At times hilarious, others disturbing, very interesting all the way through, Robert Graves wrote a masterpiece with this. I challenge anyone to read 'I, Best book I'd read in years.

I challenge anyone to read 'I, Claudius' who doesn't at least begin the less-favored sequel Claudius the God at its conclusion. In my opinion, this book should be required reading in high school world history courses.

It is dirty and violent enough to hold the interest of any hormonal teenage boys, has enough intrigue and behind-closed-doors politicking to trap the attention of young women.

I finished this book and began a year-long dive into all the Roman history I could find, culminating in a vacation to the Eternal City in November ' View 1 comment.

Feb 28, Raul Bimenyimana rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites. This was fun reading! It reminded me of the 'A Song of Fire and Ice' series.

Claudius, is a stammering lame fellow whose disabilities and weaknesses bring him both mockery and his salvation in a family plagued with scheming, deceit, betrayal, poisoning, the lust for power and the like.

The humour and action in the book makes it a great page turner and Livia has become one of my favourite villains of all time.

Shelves: historical. A fictional autobiography of a Roman Emperor 23 February Well, here is another historical novel that I actually quite enjoyed, but that may be because, unlike most historical novels that deal with fictional characters placed in an historical time period, this deals with real characters, namely the Imperial Family from the establishment of the empire to the ascension of Claudius to the throne.

As can be seen by the title, the main character is the emperor Claudius before he became emperor th A fictional autobiography of a Roman Emperor 23 February Well, here is another historical novel that I actually quite enjoyed, but that may be because, unlike most historical novels that deal with fictional characters placed in an historical time period, this deals with real characters, namely the Imperial Family from the establishment of the empire to the ascension of Claudius to the throne.

As can be seen by the title, the main character is the emperor Claudius before he became emperor the story of when he was emperor is the subject of the sequel Claudius the God.

I appears that Graves stuck quite close to the two major sources we have on this time period, namely Suetonius and Tacitus , though he also used a lot of poetic license since a much of the book deals with the interactions of Claudius with many of the other major figures at the time though he does footnote a couple of things, such a Nero, since we are likely to think he is the emperor Nero when he isn't.

Okay, the book did drag a bit in the middle, but it began to pick up again when Caligula ascended the throne and we begin to see how the power went to his head.

Claudius is an interesting character, which is why Graves chose him as the subject of the novel. He suggests it is because he gives us a good sweep of the early imperial period, something that Augustus and Tiberius don't, and Nero and Calligula are simply too obsessed with power to be able to adequately write from their point of view.

Also, Graves suggests, since Claudius was also a writer then again most Emperors were , he felt that writing a history from his point of view would be the most plausible.

This, of course, is despite the fact that he is a cripple and a stutterer, however that does not necessarily mean that he is neither unaware of the world around him, nor eloquent in the use of the written word.

One of the things that struck me as I read this book was the idea of how the transition of an empire from a non-functional democracy to a dictatorship does not necessarily bring about better times for the subjects.

I decided that instead of discussing that to a large extent here it would be better to have a look at a couple of case studies — namely France and Rome — in my blog and I will link the two posts below.

However, I will say a few things about the period after the fall of the Republic here because it does relate closely to this book. Now I, and probably many others, would consider Augustus to be a benevolent dictator.

At the time of his ascension the Republic had effectively collapsed into warring factions and Augustus, after dispatching his enemies, brought about stability and peace to the empire under his rule.

While he remained in control the ancient historians seem to hold him in high regard and do not indicate that he ever abused his power. From what it appears Rome once again began to prosper under his rule and the average person on the street got a pretty good deal.

However that all changed when he died because while Tiberius began as a reasonably benevolent ruler he did not remain that way.

As it is suggested, power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely. As Graves points out, Tiberius became a sexual deviant and in fact pretty much had sex with whomever he chose, and because he was emperor nobody could actually say no.

It is even suggested that women committed suicide rather than living with the thought of having been violated by him.

Calligula went one step worse — he was outright insane. In a way he was like a spoilt brat that never grew up much like a certain King Joffrey whom I believe nobody actually likes.

In Calligua's mind, the Roman Empire was his and his alone to do with what he wished. All property belonged to him, and if anybody even showed a hint of wanting to do away with him, they would be executed and Tiberius was much the same — he quite enjoyed throwing people off of the Tarpeian Rock.

Calligula did end up meeting a rather sticky end, and since he had pretty much dispatched all of his rivals, there was only one person left to rule — poor old Claudius.

In a way Graves does very really in crafting his character, and in many ways to begin to empathise with them. He is born a cripple and treated like an idiot, yet manages to survive two brutal dictatorships to find himself inheriting the throne by default.

It is also interesting that despite Caligula being put to the sword, his assassins decide that returning to the Republic would not be the best for the future of Rome and instead decide to put what they consider to be a harmless, and mailable, person on the throne.

My case study on the French Revolution can be found here. My case study on the Fall of the Roman Republic can be found here. View all 6 comments. It's generally accepted that I, Claudius is one of best Roman historical novels ever written.

Given this, it has to be assumed that amount of research that Robert Graves did for this book would have to have been prodigious. Now, this is a novel and not an historical textbook.

And if only half of it is accurate it's still a miracle that the Romans were able to create an Empire that would, to this very day, influence world history.

The life of Claudius is told by Claudius, himself, as he reads his m It's generally accepted that I, Claudius is one of best Roman historical novels ever written.

The life of Claudius is told by Claudius, himself, as he reads his memoirs to the reader. And what a story it is. Being born into either the Julian or Claudian families was not something you would wish on your worst enemy.

Ninety percent of either family usually ended up being brutally murdered or poisoned at a young age.

The ruling families were despotic to the extreme. Every cide known to man was committed by them. Patricide, matricide, infanticide. Their sexual proclivities were only limited by their imaginations.

They were either all mad or psychopaths, or both. Claudius was considered to be an idiot by the rest of his family because he was lame and had a speech impediment.

Ironically Claudius was probably the most normal member of his family. There's not much here about military campagnes, the topic is touched but not in any detail.

This is more about the hunger of power and the excesses that people are prepared to go to achieve it.

Achieving power is only half of the battle. Holding on to it is the other half. Prepare for a blood bath. Highly recommended for lovers of historical fiction.

May 27, Sara rated it really liked it Shelves: historical-fiction , modern-classics , kindle-purchase. The production included the events of both of Graves Claudius novels and featured a cast that would include some of the best actors of the century, among them Derek Jacobi, an unforgettable Claudius.

After watching it, I read Robert Graves novel from which its name was derived, but never got around to the second half of the story, Claudius the God.

Fast forward to today, and I am at last revisiting the first novel in anticipation of reading the second. What an amazing piece of historical fiction this is!

I do not think bringing this era to life and making it relatable is easy, but Robert Graves makes it seem so. What an unlikely hero is the stammering, crippled Claudius, but what a clear-sighted and good man he is, despite his times.

How can you keep your sanity when there is so much arbitrary killing?

Robert Graves. Given this, it has to be assumed that amount of research that Robert Graves did for this book would have to have been prodigious. Rome Italy Italy Roman Empire. Born In China 20 January On being relieved of the "Olympian Mixture", Claudius is crushed and Sayajin that the only way the Republic can be restored is by having a true mad monarch rather than the reign of a benevolent one. The conversation between Claudius and I Claudius when Caligula reveals himself as a god made me laugh out loud and it's a good example of how good Graves is when he writes scenes, rather than narrative!

I Claudius - Ich, Claudius, Kaiser und Gott – Streams

Aber stattdessen akzeptiert der Senat des Kaisers Göttlichkeit. Ein berühmt gewordenes, in 16 Sprachen übersetztes Buch mit einer deutschen Gesamtauflage von über 1 Million Exemplaren. Sie initiiert einen Beischlafwettbewerb mit Sylla, der erfolgreichsten The Expendables 3 Stream Kinox Roms — und gewinnt ihn spielend. Auch Gemellus lässt er töten. Die Hauptzeugin, die passionierte Giftmischerin Martina, wird vor der Verhandlung von Claudius und seinem Freund Herodes Agrippa an einem geheimen Ort versteckt, wird jedoch von Livias Spitzeln gefunden. Sejanus hat sich überdies von seiner Frau scheiden lassen und ersucht Tiberius, seiner Heirat mit Livilla zuzustimmen. Währenddessen erfährt der als idiotischer Mick Fleetwood allseits verlachte Claudius von dem Historiker Chroniken Der Unterwelt – City Of Bones Stream Polliodass Star Trek Movies Vater Drusus vor vielen Jahren einem Mord zum Opfer gefallen sein soll. Sein Onkel Claudius wird gezwungen, den Zahlmeisterposten zu übernehmen. Nach anfänglicher Wiederaufnahme der Szene und einer erneuten Sendung zwei Tage später wurde die Aufnahme des Fötus entfernt, sodass die Episode nun mit Claudius' Home Stream und entsetztem Blick endet, während der Zuschauer nicht sieht, was er erblickt. Als Drusus in Germanien vom Pferd fällt und dabei verletzt wird, entsendet Livia ihren zuverlässigen Leibarzt mit spezieller Order an die Front — kurz darauf stirbt Drusus im Beisein seiner Frau Elfen Bilder und des kürzlich geborenen gemeinsamen Sohnes Claudius. Als sich Messalina öffentlich von Claudius scheiden lässt und ihren Liebhaber Gaius Silius heiratet, kommt es zur blutigen Kraftprobe. Jetzt online bestellen! Heimlieferung oder in Filiale: I, Claudius von Robert Graves | Orell Füssli: Der Buchhändler Ihres Vertrauens. I, Claudius. zum Trailer. BBC-Produktion über das Leben des römischen Kaisers, die fern opulenter. Der alternde Kaiser Claudius verfasst seine Memoiren. Er beginnt mit einem Ereignis vor seiner Geburt: jenem Bankett, das Kaiser Augustus und dessen. I, Claudius is Robert Graves' riveting account of Ancient Rome in all its madness and debauchery. First published in , and written in the form of Claud. Auf Sex Ehe Totenbahre liegend und im Wissen, dass Britannicus, Agripinilla und Nero letztlich eines gewaltsamen Todes sterben werden, lachen der verstorbene Imperator Renée Felice Smith die Sibylle Eine Der Halligen 5 Buchstaben ob der Tatsache, dass Claudius eine zweite Kopie seines The Walking Dead Staffel 5 Deutsch Online Schauen vergraben hat, die Jahrhunderte später gefunden werden soll. Hans Rothe. Tropic Thunder Stream Deutsch ein Buch kann man nicht verkaufen! Heide Lunzer weniger. Die diegetische — also von den Akteuren selbst gehörte oder gespielte — Musik der meisten Episoden stammt von David Wulstan und dem Ensemble Clerkes of Oxenford.

I Claudius More stories Video

Xena-S06E12-Caligula-2/5-Deutsch- I Claudius

I Claudius reviewed by Praj Prolonged use of both valium and absolute power may do unusual things to people's libido but who is going to draw such a moral from the romping morass which we can tinopen here in the untangleble tale of the nincompoop emperor.

Kings and lords and high spastic rulers and their horrid affairs, filthy fate, covetousness, allegiance, brutalities, treachery and chastisements metamorphosing from the coccoon of mighty power and disgusting love, such as it may be so-called.

I not however. A book for everyone that lives. You got it. View all 48 comments. Jul 20, Lyn rated it really liked it.

Compelling, humorous, entertaining and even at time times deeply disturbing, this traces the peripheral rise of an unlikely Caeser. Historical fiction at its best, Graves provides an in-depth, behind the scenes look at early Roman Imperial intrigue.

First published in , this has been selected as one of the finest English language works in the twentieth century. View all 12 comments.

Game of Rome s History is the lie of the victors. Granted there are c Game of Rome s History is the lie of the victors. Granted there are certain truths that only a tabloid can tell.

Of course, in this case it is idiotic to look for historical accuracy in fiction but certain things that happen are just so wicked that you have to wonder whether these lies are just that.

This review aims to take on the impossible task of diluting the deceitful mixture to separate the lies of the writer from the more essential lies of the victors.

There's actually very little in I, Claudius that's entirely unattested. But the thing is Robert Graves based on historical works that are biased and unreliable and he portrays the characters in a way to fit his underlying narrative.

Graves relied most heavily on Suetonius and Tacitus. He drew on Suetonius and a host of late Roman authors who are inaccurate at best, particularly for his narration of the earlier emperors to provide all sorts of juicy gossip that those works are full of.

But then he had a problem. There was a sharp division among writers of the 1st and 2nd Centuries, A. Many of his contemporaries, and particularly the Neronians, saw Claudius as the bumbling old idiot that you can find in the pages of Seneca and Suetonius.

However, under the Flavians Claudius became a model emperor, who was a struggling intellectual and who expanded Roman power militarily and through his public works, rather than the idiot who let everyone else do all the work for him and eventually had to rely on his wife so much that he fell into her trap easily.

Graves chooses the Flavian view of Claudius, and attempts to explain away the aspects of his character seen negatively by Suetonius and Seneca by various means.

Graves claimed that it occurred to him while reading through Suetonius and Tacitus that perhaps Claudius was not really as stupid as everyone else thought and that he was cleverly trying to stay alive in a time of intrigue and plotting that undoubtedly would have killed him otherwise.

As a result, the works are highly sifted and selected to provide particular, no matter how unlikely, versions of the events that took place.

There's nothing to suggest that Claudius, Livia, Augustus, or any of the other characters thought many of the things that Graves puts in their minds.

We know they did certain things, and there are a number of reasons why they might have done so. Graves picks the reasons he particularly likes and crafts a very good story from it, imagining that it is true, whether it is or not.

The other thing that Graves fabricates is holes in the record. Graves is very fond of linking events together that probably didn't have any connection--the famous example is the important character of Cassius Chaerea, who appears all over the place and is a major plot-driver.

The historical Cassius Chaerea is only known as the prefect of the Praetorian Guard who was hated and teased by Caligula and eventually was one of the leaders of the plot to murder him.

Whenever Chaerea appears elsewhere in I, Claudius Graves is in fact imposing his character on a historical person.

Basically, whenever Chaerea appears before then he's actually playing someone who the record says was named Cassius, and that Graves assumes or pretends was Chaerea, for plot purposes.

There's no reason to suggest, for example, that the same Cassius who led the survivors out of the Teutoburg was the guy who killed Caligula--Cassius was, after all, the name of one of the largest families in Rome.

As I end, let me entertain you a bit. What they lack in strength or in beauty, they make up for in cunning and intelligence. He comes from a family that comes to power because of a deceitful but nevertheless remarkable woman Livia aka Cersei then becomes the steward of sorts to his insane nephew Geoffrey or Caligula rather.

Sometimes you need a lie to get to the truth. Immediately after the book was published the classical community exploded, with some denouncing the book and condemning Graves who explicitly states that he was not attempting any sort of historical or professional publication with the book, merely his own fancy , but it also initiated scholars to go back and revisit the textual material.

In general the book prompted a mass re-reading of all the material on Claudius, if only to fact-check Graves, and a great deal of things that were overlooked until then popped out.

This coincided with a revisiting of the emperors in general. View all 9 comments. Dec 06, Michael Finocchiaro rated it it was amazing Shelves: novels , historical-fiction , englishth-c , classics.

Robert Graves' classic I, Claudius is a masterpiece of historical fiction about the stuttering, lame unlikely emperor Claudius ending just as he mounts the imperial throne one must read Claudius the God and His Wife Messalina for the rest - high on my TBR now.

It is a mesmerizing text detailing the reigns of Augustus, Tiberius and Caligula with all the accompanying betrayals, violence and sexual exploits that you would expect from a particularly gruesome early episode in the Game of Thrones.

W Robert Graves' classic I, Claudius is a masterpiece of historical fiction about the stuttering, lame unlikely emperor Claudius ending just as he mounts the imperial throne one must read Claudius the God and His Wife Messalina for the rest - high on my TBR now.

Well, the sexual exploits are mostly hinted at without gory details, but the rest is, well, rather violent to say the least.

There are moments of humor too. The debate between Livy and Pollio about their various approaches to history with Claudius in the middle was memorable.

With his typically cutting wit, Claudius sums up the two approaches: "It's not disillusion, sir. I see now, though I hadn't considered it before, that there are two different ways of writing history: one is to persuade men to virtue and the other is to compel men to truth.

The first is Livy's way and the other is yours and perhaps they are not irreconciliable. In this book, Graves follows Claudius' leaning towards Pollio's view because the morals of all the protagonists are certainly not something that would compel any sane person to truth.

This same Pollio, before passing away, gave Claudius the best advice he ever received: "Then exagerrate your limp, stammer deliberately, sham sickness frequently, let your wits wander, jerk your head and twich with your hands on all public or semi-public occasions.

If you could see as much as I see, you would know that this was your only hope of safety and eventual glory. Fortunately for him, Claudius does take this advice to heart.

Graves seems to speak though his protagonist as he reacts to various pronouncements that occur in the book, but doubtless also during his lifetime in early 20th C Britain: "To recommend a monarchy on account of the prosperity it gives to the provinces seems to me like something that a man should have liberty to treat his children as slaves, if at the same time he treats his slaves with reasonable consideration.

In another example of dark humor, when Drusillus is murdered, he is found with a pear shoved down his throat in a lame attempt to excuse the assassination as an accident.

As was the custom for in such cases, the pear tree was charged with murder and sentenced to be uprooted and burned. This may sound particularly awful, but there are worse fates awaiting children under Caligula's reign.

In this book, it takes about 75 pages to build a head of steam and then it runs us right over the cliff over and over again with the evil characters of Livia and Caligula in particular, the manipulation of Augustus and Tiberius, and the foreshortened fates of literally dozens of family members and thousands of Roman citizens.

A must read. And, if I may, the insanity of Caligula and his particular communication and governing style bears comparison to that of the orange menace at Penn Ave at the moment View 2 comments.

I was going to write that Graves having translated The Twelve Caesars recycled the Suetonius with a dash of Tacitus and some added murders to create I Claudius - ostensibly the memoirs of the Emperor Claudius.

This, however, seems to be entirely false as Graves wrote I, Claudius more than twenty years before he made that translation.

He was though living on Majorca, which is not quite Capri, and if isolated and obsessing over his muse, not quite in Tiberian style. In my imagination then I have to I was going to write that Graves having translated The Twelve Caesars recycled the Suetonius with a dash of Tacitus and some added murders to create I Claudius - ostensibly the memoirs of the Emperor Claudius.

In my imagination then I have to place I, Claudius back in the s, a few years after this memoir of the First World War Goodbye to all that and put this portrait of an imagined secret life of an Imperial family with its incest, non-normative elective sexual activities some of which remain illegal in various countries, and family murders to gain or maintain power mentally in the context of the official rigid Victorianism of the Britain of George V.

Is I, Claudius just a fictional interpretation of the really already quite turbulent Julio-Claudian dynasty, or is it worth thinking about it as the continuation of Goodbye to all that?

Is this Graves drawing back the Imperial curtain and showing us the archetypal family life of all Emperors? Don't be fooled by the noble faces on the coins he says, they may not smell view spoiler [as Vespasian said to Titus about the money raised by a urine tax hide spoiler ] but their daily reality is sordid all the same.

Alternatively this is just some whimsy on my part and the genesis of I, Claudius was simply Graves' need to earn some pennies while living on Majorca so that he could continue to obsess over his muse in decent isolation.

Anyhow this is a fun bit of historical fiction even if the reality may well have been slightly less murderous than Graves' novel, even without which the Romans seem to have been the least shy of all earthly empires to date when it came to prematurely terminating the reigns of Emperors.

One might look at Beard's argument with dismay, then again from another viewpoint it shows the power of fiction writing and characterisation, of creating a narrative.

View all 14 comments. Sep 03, Riku Sayuj rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , r-r-rs. What nonsense! But at least I'll be able to make people read my books now.

Meanwhile, have a short and enjoyable snapshot sampling of the book by going through the-easy-to-follow family tree given below.

Ah, the tales that can be told while tracing those lines… View all 11 comments. Jul 16, Sarah Presto agitato rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Those interested in the real Hunger Games.

Shelves: favorite-books , historical-fiction , roma-spqr. Poor Clau-Clau-Claudius. He stuttered, had a limp, and was deaf in one ear.

Considered the family idiot, he had the misfortune to be born into a family that suffered from a congenital lack of compassion.

Seen as dull-witted and harmless by his ruthless relatives, Claudius managed to avoid view spoiler [almost hide spoiler ] the poisoning, banishment, starvation, stabbing, and suici Poor Clau-Clau-Claudius.

Seen as dull-witted and harmless by his ruthless relatives, Claudius managed to avoid view spoiler [almost hide spoiler ] the poisoning, banishment, starvation, stabbing, and suicide to which many of his more prominent associates fell victim.

He was the family outcast, but innocuous enough to be left alone to observe the antics of those around him, and, as a historian, he recorded it all to share with us.

Still, compared to his nephew Caligula, who made his horse a Senator and had entire sections of the crowd thrown to the lions out of boredom, Claudius can not help but seem refreshingly sane and humane.

Livia, the real power behind Caesar Augustus Graves occasionally allows himself to give commentary through Claudius. He gives a plug to the English, too, when he lists as one of three impossible things the idea of subduing the island of Britain p.

I, Claudius , however, is excellent historical fiction. The characters are believable, depicted with wit and even a touch of modern relevance.

Apr 16, Kalliope rated it it was amazing Shelves: historical-fiction , re-reads , , italy , classical , fiction-english.

This is the third time I have read this book. There are few I have read so many times. But this book and its sequels formed the groundwork for my understanding of classical Roman times, at least of its Empire.

I first read this when I was very young but even if my main concern then was to decipher the English it left its roots for my understanding of everything Roman and a positive taste for historical fiction.

The second time I concentrated on learning the genealogical tree of the Claudians. Th This is the third time I have read this book. This time I have concentrated on the way Graves builds a logical development of events.

Reading it, and particularly watching the BBC serial in parallel, it seems the span of time is shorter, considering how fast events unfold.

The plot of the novel can be understood as an obstacle race. How many lives had to be ended so that Augustus would be succeeded by his unbeloved stepson Tiberius?

These were eight, and in this order: 1. Agrippa his close and trusted friend, partner and son in law — dead in 12BC , 3.

Drusus stepson — gone in 9BC , 4. Julia daughter — banned in 2BC , 5. Gaius grandson and brother to Gaius — perished in 4AD , 7. This succession, if surveyed fast, seems like the Claudians were playing the Russian roulette.

She was the one who kept turning around the roulette of destiny dissolving those obstacles with poison. And was this an act of love?

Love for her son Tiberius? Not really, for remember that number 3 above, Drusus, was also her son. What was at stake was something else.

For Tiberius was not particularly fond of his mother either. So, why did Livia push her ambition to the keep her family in power at the expense of exterminating several of its members included her husband whom she did love?

Her own ambition? Tiberius was a better candidate than Drusus because she could manipulate the former; he was scared of her and was insecure.

She would rule through him for fifteen more years after Augustus death, until her own death in 29AD. Graves is devising a plot and a directing thread to his novel is not just offering us a soap opera.

There is a political interpretation too. For us it is now almost indisputable that the Empire would follow the Roman republic for several centuries.

The peace enjoyed under Augustus had been welcomed with such relief by those who had lived through the civil wars was still very much associated with him.

If he went, so would the peace and prosperity of all. And this is what Livia tried to preserve and for her only through an Empire, with a firm an unquestioned centralization of power under one man yes, there was that Senate, but one could always go around it , could this be achieved.

Her hand is therefore also felt once her son rules and the roulette continues turning around, but it gradually loses its political purpose, becoming a circus when her grandson Caligula takes on the eagle.

Her plan failed at the end because her understanding of Empire did not consider how easily it could degenerate into a Despot-system and her own descendant decided that she could rot in Hell.

In this third read then I have tried to track the way Graves imposes some sense, thanks to human intention, onto a set of incomprehensible events in history.

Underlying this we have the proposition of human will versus the randomess of destiny. View all 15 comments. May 16, Aubrey rated it really liked it Shelves: 4-star , reviewed , 1-read-on-hand , r-goodreads , r There have been multiple periods of time in my life during which I developed a fascination for different historical families, usually of infamous repute.

Elementary school was devoted to the Tudors, focusing heavily on the Princess Elizabeth, while middle through high school was preoccupied with the Borgias, an interest more balanced between its equally intriguing members.

Every so often those fascinations will spark up again, and I will find myself consuming relevant impressively rendered ficti There have been multiple periods of time in my life during which I developed a fascination for different historical families, usually of infamous repute.

Every so often those fascinations will spark up again, and I will find myself consuming relevant impressively rendered fiction and biographically accurate nonfiction with equal fervor.

I would not be able to tell you why these subjects had attracted me while I was young, but I do have a hypothesis as to why they continue to interest me today.

Both the Tudors and the Borgias were at the center of major confluences in their day, and both rested in the eyes of storms largely fueled by religion.

While the Borgias clawed their way to the top of the papal throne amidst vicious rumors of debauched blasphemy, the Tudors with Henry VIII as their figurehead rejected that system of belief completely in favor of one that would serve their own ends.

And it is this intersection of human figures in places of immense power with religious forces, and what results, that makes for truly spellbinding tales, fictional or no.

I, Claudius is an example of this theological maelstrom, but is even more striking when taken into consideration that the Emperors of Rome could be deified, whether by popular plea by the public or by the crazed hysterics of the ruler himself.

Not a king in consultation with powerful people both religious and otherwise, nor a pope equipped with papal infallibility in the spiritual sense.

A god. The effect that this mentality must have had on its believers is not fully explored, as Claudius is not one for psychological profiles or sociocultural analysis.

His two interests throughout the story are largely restricted to the realms of historical recountal and simple survival, as his family discredits, banishes, poisons, and pushes to suicide any member they deem in their way.

I do not blame him in the slightest, but I cannot help but wish that there was more to the story than the bare facts and occasional personal inputs that Claudius limited himself to.

Or I suppose the matter would have fallen to Graves, seeing as this for all its evidence of substantial research is a work of fiction.

For the potential of deification works its way into the heart of every major player, beginning with Augustus' boasts of his relations to the deified Julius Caeser, and ending with Caligula's assumption of the role of any god or goddess, a decision dictated only by his increasingly errant and murderous behavior.

Of special note is Livia Drusilla, the wife of Augustus, who of all the characters proved to be the most controversially engaging.

Her first manipulation on a grand scale removes her from her first husband and places her at the side of Augustus, then called Octavian, an enemy of her family that drove her father to suicide.

From thereon out she is strongly present in the ruling of the Roman Empire, a time when women were banned from the senate and widowed mothers were placed under the guardianship of their own sons.

She goes to any lengths without any seeming sentiment in order to ensure the health of the Empire, a health that she believes can be maintained only by her line.

When considering her considerable prowess in ruling through Augustus, this was not a bad assumption to make at all.

She spent nearly her entire life working to bring the Empire out of bloody civil war and into an age of Emperor ruled peace and prosperity, but she does not believe that this will save her from the fires of the underworld.

The only thing that can save her from punishment for poisoning and banishing multitudes, many of them members of her own family, is to make her a god.

It is through his eyes that one is able to see that, while Livia was a masterful player at the game of all-powerful leadership, she did not give much thought to the psychological damage she was wreaking on those she expected to continue her rule, or how they would manage to cope without her complete control of the realm.

If she had, it is hard to say how the history of Western Roman Empire would have evolved. My bets are on that it would not have ended with Nero, and maybe would even have continued for far longer than it ended up doing.

That is pure conjecture, though. Based on the brief insights into his character that he chose to insert into his historical account, within the academically inclined soul of his there lies some small worms of grandeur, lofty views of himself that so far his career of pandering and pretending have not substantiated.

It will be interesting to see whether these worms grow any, and how they express themselves when his hands grasp the reins of the Empire and they are let loose on a much wider field of play.

He is the newest member of this train of deified royalty, and how he chooses to handles this powerful mantle remains to be seen. View all 26 comments.

Oct 09, Alex rated it it was amazing Shelves: poison , , novel-a-biography , rth-lifetime. I like I, Claudius a lot, but what is it? It's a slow character study of subtle, canny Claudius, who's one of the most likable protagonists I've read recently.

Self-deprecating and brilliant, he's more proactive than he chooses to mention. It's a history lesson, but not a trustworthy one. This is a good example of something I think of as the Nero Rule.

Nero, see, put cages on poles and set Christians on fire in them and used them as streetlights. He probably didn't, actually, but that's a cool sto I like I, Claudius a lot, but what is it?

He probably didn't, actually, but that's a cool story. There are lots of cool stories in history - did you know how Alexander the Great died?

Aristotle poisoned him! So responsible history tends to be a little more boring, but if you want to be sure about what happened, there you go.

I, Claudius is like a master class in Nero Rule History: if it probably didn't happen, it's in here. It's basically impossible to keep all the characters straight, and after trying really hard to do so I guess my advice to you would be don't bother.

You'll learn the major characters - Livia, Tiberius, Germanicus, Claudius himself - and the rest Here's a chart I referred to constantly, but it did me no good.

I found it best to enjoy it without overthinking it. Loads of exciting things happen. Claudius is a master of the soft approach - redirecting attacks instead of countering them.

It's not great history, but it's great fun. View all 16 comments. Feb 19, Blaine DeSantis rated it it was amazing.

My word, what a book! I began by saying that this was one book from my library I wanted to read, and I am so glad I started the year with it.

Being Italian, loving History and having visited Rome many times helped me enjoy this book. Is allegedly an autobiography of Claudius, but is really a historical fiction book which does a super job of seeing Rome and the empire through the eyes of the physically challenged Claudius, a relative of Augustus Caesar who is so non-threatening that nobody t My word, what a book!

Is allegedly an autobiography of Claudius, but is really a historical fiction book which does a super job of seeing Rome and the empire through the eyes of the physically challenged Claudius, a relative of Augustus Caesar who is so non-threatening that nobody tries to kill him and who will eventually rise to become Emperor of Rome.

Great historical details taken from works of Suetonius and Tacitus and, again, is supposed to be Claudius writing his and his families history.

Shows how his grandmother, Livia, is the power behind the crown, and does not really write highly about Augustus and especially Tiberius.

Caligula gets the last 70 pages of the book and we easily see why he was assassinated! It is not the fastest book to read, partly due to very small font size, but I found the last pages flew by.

A great read, and now I must make the effort to read the 2nd book of the series, Claudius the God. Very happy I made this my reading priority for !

View all 3 comments. Feb 20, Luke Peterson rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: everyone. Shelves: favorites. Best book I'd read in years. I, Claudius is a brilliantly written piece of historical fiction from the perspective of a hapless-yet-intelligent black sheep of the Julio-Claudian house during the Augustan era of the Roman Empire who stumbles his way through to survive the reigns of Augustus, Tiberius, and Caligula only to be made emperor himself.

At times hilarious, others disturbing, very interesting all the way through, Robert Graves wrote a masterpiece with this. I challenge anyone to read 'I, Best book I'd read in years.

I challenge anyone to read 'I, Claudius' who doesn't at least begin the less-favored sequel Claudius the God at its conclusion.

In my opinion, this book should be required reading in high school world history courses. It is dirty and violent enough to hold the interest of any hormonal teenage boys, has enough intrigue and behind-closed-doors politicking to trap the attention of young women.

I finished this book and began a year-long dive into all the Roman history I could find, culminating in a vacation to the Eternal City in November ' View 1 comment.

Feb 28, Raul Bimenyimana rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites. This was fun reading! It reminded me of the 'A Song of Fire and Ice' series.

Claudius, is a stammering lame fellow whose disabilities and weaknesses bring him both mockery and his salvation in a family plagued with scheming, deceit, betrayal, poisoning, the lust for power and the like.

The humour and action in the book makes it a great page turner and Livia has become one of my favourite villains of all time. Shelves: historical.

A fictional autobiography of a Roman Emperor 23 February Well, here is another historical novel that I actually quite enjoyed, but that may be because, unlike most historical novels that deal with fictional characters placed in an historical time period, this deals with real characters, namely the Imperial Family from the establishment of the empire to the ascension of Claudius to the throne.

As can be seen by the title, the main character is the emperor Claudius before he became emperor th A fictional autobiography of a Roman Emperor 23 February Well, here is another historical novel that I actually quite enjoyed, but that may be because, unlike most historical novels that deal with fictional characters placed in an historical time period, this deals with real characters, namely the Imperial Family from the establishment of the empire to the ascension of Claudius to the throne.

As can be seen by the title, the main character is the emperor Claudius before he became emperor the story of when he was emperor is the subject of the sequel Claudius the God.

I appears that Graves stuck quite close to the two major sources we have on this time period, namely Suetonius and Tacitus , though he also used a lot of poetic license since a much of the book deals with the interactions of Claudius with many of the other major figures at the time though he does footnote a couple of things, such a Nero, since we are likely to think he is the emperor Nero when he isn't.

Okay, the book did drag a bit in the middle, but it began to pick up again when Caligula ascended the throne and we begin to see how the power went to his head.

Claudius is an interesting character, which is why Graves chose him as the subject of the novel.

He suggests it is because he gives us a good sweep of the early imperial period, something that Augustus and Tiberius don't, and Nero and Calligula are simply too obsessed with power to be able to adequately write from their point of view.

Also, Graves suggests, since Claudius was also a writer then again most Emperors were , he felt that writing a history from his point of view would be the most plausible.

This, of course, is despite the fact that he is a cripple and a stutterer, however that does not necessarily mean that he is neither unaware of the world around him, nor eloquent in the use of the written word.

One of the things that struck me as I read this book was the idea of how the transition of an empire from a non-functional democracy to a dictatorship does not necessarily bring about better times for the subjects.

I decided that instead of discussing that to a large extent here it would be better to have a look at a couple of case studies — namely France and Rome — in my blog and I will link the two posts below.

However, I will say a few things about the period after the fall of the Republic here because it does relate closely to this book.

Now I, and probably many others, would consider Augustus to be a benevolent dictator. At the time of his ascension the Republic had effectively collapsed into warring factions and Augustus, after dispatching his enemies, brought about stability and peace to the empire under his rule.

While he remained in control the ancient historians seem to hold him in high regard and do not indicate that he ever abused his power.

From what it appears Rome once again began to prosper under his rule and the average person on the street got a pretty good deal.

However that all changed when he died because while Tiberius began as a reasonably benevolent ruler he did not remain that way.

As it is suggested, power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely. As Graves points out, Tiberius became a sexual deviant and in fact pretty much had sex with whomever he chose, and because he was emperor nobody could actually say no.

It is even suggested that women committed suicide rather than living with the thought of having been violated by him.

Calligula went one step worse — he was outright insane. In a way he was like a spoilt brat that never grew up much like a certain King Joffrey whom I believe nobody actually likes.

In Calligua's mind, the Roman Empire was his and his alone to do with what he wished. All property belonged to him, and if anybody even showed a hint of wanting to do away with him, they would be executed and Tiberius was much the same — he quite enjoyed throwing people off of the Tarpeian Rock.

Calligula did end up meeting a rather sticky end, and since he had pretty much dispatched all of his rivals, there was only one person left to rule — poor old Claudius.

In a way Graves does very really in crafting his character, and in many ways to begin to empathise with them. He is born a cripple and treated like an idiot, yet manages to survive two brutal dictatorships to find himself inheriting the throne by default.

It is also interesting that despite Caligula being put to the sword, his assassins decide that returning to the Republic would not be the best for the future of Rome and instead decide to put what they consider to be a harmless, and mailable, person on the throne.

My case study on the French Revolution can be found here. My case study on the Fall of the Roman Republic can be found here.

View all 6 comments. It's generally accepted that I, Claudius is one of best Roman historical novels ever written. Given this, it has to be assumed that amount of research that Robert Graves did for this book would have to have been prodigious.

Now, this is a novel and not an historical textbook. And if only half of it is accurate it's still a miracle that the Romans were able to create an Empire that would, to this very day, influence world history.

The life of Claudius is told by Claudius, himself, as he reads his m It's generally accepted that I, Claudius is one of best Roman historical novels ever written.

The life of Claudius is told by Claudius, himself, as he reads his memoirs to the reader. And what a story it is. Being born into either the Julian or Claudian families was not something you would wish on your worst enemy.

Ninety percent of either family usually ended up being brutally murdered or poisoned at a young age.

The ruling families were despotic to the extreme. Every cide known to man was committed by them. Patricide, matricide, infanticide.

Their sexual proclivities were only limited by their imaginations. They were either all mad or psychopaths, or both.

Claudius was considered to be an idiot by the rest of his family because he was lame and had a speech impediment. Ironically Claudius was probably the most normal member of his family.

There's not much here about military campagnes, the topic is touched but not in any detail. This is more about the hunger of power and the excesses that people are prepared to go to achieve it.

Achieving power is only half of the battle. Holding on to it is the other half. Prepare for a blood bath. Highly recommended for lovers of historical fiction.

May 27, Sara rated it really liked it Shelves: historical-fiction , modern-classics , kindle-purchase. The production included the events of both of Graves Claudius novels and featured a cast that would include some of the best actors of the century, among them Derek Jacobi, an unforgettable Claudius.

After watching it, I read Robert Graves novel from which its name was derived, but never got around to the second half of the story, Claudius the God.

Fast forward to today, and I am at last revisiting the first novel in anticipation of reading the second. What an amazing piece of historical fiction this is!

A grandson of Mark Antony and great-nephew of Augustus , he was a member of the Julio-Claudian family , Rome's first imperial ruling family.

Claudius' family kept him out of public life until his sudden coronation at the age of fifty because of his persistent stammer, limp, and other nervous tics, which caused others to perceive him as mentally deficient and not a threat to his ambitious relatives.

Even as his symptoms began to wane in his teenage years, he ran into trouble as a budding historian; his work on a history of the Roman civil wars was too truthful and too critical of the reigning emperor Augustus, and his mother Antonia Minor and grandmother Livia quickly put a stop to it.

This episode reinforced their initial suspicions that Claudius was not fit for public office. Claudius was portrayed this way by scholars for most of history, and Graves uses these peculiarities to develop a sympathetic character whose survival in a murderous dynasty depends upon his family's incorrect assumption that he is a harmless idiot.

Graves' interpretation of the story owes much to the histories of Gaius Cornelius Tacitus , Plutarch , and especially Suetonius ' Lives of the Twelve Caesars.

Graves translated Suetonius before writing the novels and claimed that after reading Suetonius, Claudius came to him in a dream one night and demanded that his real story be told.

I, Claudius is written as a first-person narrative of Roman history from Claudius' perspective, covering the reigns of Augustus, Tiberius , and Caligula ; Claudius the God is written as a later addition documenting Claudius' own reign.

The real Claudius was a trained historian and is known to have written an autobiography now lost in eight books that covered the same period.

Graves provides a theme for the story by having the fictional Claudius describe a visit to Cumae , where he receives a prophecy in verse from the Sibyl and an additional prophecy contained in a book of "Sibylline Curiosities".

The latter concerns the fates of the "hairy ones" i. The penultimate verse concerns his reign and Claudius assumes that he can tell the identity of the last emperor described in the prophecy.

Graves establishes a fatalistic tone that plays out at the end of Claudius the God when Claudius correctly predicts his assassination and succession by Nero.

At Cumae, the Sibyl tells Claudius that he will "speak clear". Claudius believes this means that his secret memoirs will one day be found and that he, having written the truth, will speak clearly, while his contemporaries, who had to distort their histories to appease the ruling family, will seem like stammerers.

Since he wishes to record his life for posterity, Claudius explains that he chooses to write in Greek , which he believes will remain "the chief literary language of the world".

This enables Graves' Claudius to offer explanations of Latin wordplay or etymologies that would seem unnecessary if his autobiography had been written for native Latin speakers.

Writing in the first-person from an unspecified time period, presumably late in his own reign as emperor , Claudius establishes himself as the author of this history of his family and insists on writing the truth, which includes harsh criticisms of the deified Augustus and especially of Livia.

The narrative begins prior to his own birth, as he describes many of the events leading to the foundation of the Roman Principate and the increasingly firm emplacement of Augustus as emperor despite Augustus' own publicly expressed intention to eventually restore the former Republic.

During his prosperous reign, Augustus is plagued by personal losses as his favored heirs, Marcellus , Marcus Agrippa , Gaius Caesar , and Lucius Caesar , die.

Claudius reveals that these untimely deaths are all the machinations of Augustus' third wife Livia who is also Claudius' paternal grandmother , a calculating murderess who seeks to make her son Tiberius Claudius' uncle succeed Augustus as the next emperor.

As these intrigues occur, the sickly Claudius is born and is immediately shunned and mocked by his family. Only his brother Germanicus and his cousin Postumus treat him with any kindness.

He is eventually given a great tutor, the reputable historian Athenodorus , who fosters a love of history and republican government in the young Claudius.

During these early years, Claudius is advised by his idol Asinius Pollio to play the fool to survive. Postumus is eventually framed for raping Claudius' sister Livilla and beating his own niece Aemilia; Augustus has him banished to an island off the coast of Italy, but not before Postumus reveals the truth to Claudius.

Claudius then passes this on to Germanicus, who convinces Augustus of Postumus' innocence. Augustus exchanges the exiled Postumus with a double named Clemens and secretly writes a will restoring Postumus as his heir, but Livia manages to discover this and poisons Augustus.

Upon Augustus' death, Tiberius is declared emperor, though his mother Livia retains her power and influence as empress. The Roman legions campaigning in Germany refuse to accept the unpopular Tiberius and begin to mutiny, instead declaring Germanicus emperor.

Shocked and confused, Germanicus refuses, declaring his loyalty to Tiberius. He sends his wife Agrippina and youngest son Caligula away from the military frontier and asks Claudius for an enormous sum of money to pay the soldiers.

Claudius agrees and pretends that they are gambling debts. With the money and the return of Caligula, Germanicus ends the mutiny and leads several successful campaigns in Germany.

In the midst of this, Claudius is informed that Postumus is alive and secretly forming a resistance group to take back his rightful place in Rome.

Claudius' letters to Germanicus about Postumus are intercepted by Livia; Postumus is later captured and executed by Tiberius.

Livia, recognizing that Claudius is a threat, sends him to Carthage to prevent him from having contact with Germanicus. Growing to fear Germanicus' popularity more and more, Tiberius sends a hostile governor, Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso , to spy on Germanicus.

Germanicus soon becomes plagued by witchcraft before dying of poison. It is later revealed that Germanicus' son Caligula was the instigator of the witchcraft.

As Tiberius becomes more hated by the public, he increasingly relies on his Praetorian Captain Sejanus to administer his edicts and punishments, who is able to manipulate Tiberius into suspecting that Germanicus' wife Agrippina and his own son Castor are plotting to usurp the monarchy.

Sejanus meanwhile secretly plots with Livilla to usurp the monarchy for himself by poisoning Castor and systematically eliminating any ally of Agrippina and her sons.

Agrippina only survives due to the protection of Livia, who holds vital information regarding Augustus' true opinion of Tiberius. Livia then hosts a surprising dinner, to which Claudius and Caligula are invited.

She predicts that Caligula and not his older brothers will become emperor and that Claudius will succeed him.

She privately admits to Claudius to having ordered the poisonings and assassinations of many people, and then begs Claudius to swear to deify her as a goddess, believing it will grant her a blissful afterlife, to which he agrees.

Claudius is later invited to Livia's deathbed and reveals that Caligula betrayed his promise. Claudius swears that Livia will become the Queen of Heaven, which moves Livia to declare he is no fool before she dies.

Tiberius, now free of Livia, loses all compunction and executes hundreds of influential citizens on false charges of treason.

He banishes Agrippina and her son Nero , while Agrippina's son Drusus is imprisoned and starved to death in Rome. Tiberius retreats from public life to the island of Capri and Sejanus is given full command of the city in his absence, becoming de facto ruler of Rome.

Tiberius is soon alerted to Sejanus' treachery by a letter from Antonia Minor and allies himself with Caligula, despite his awareness of Caligula's growing wickedness and narcissism, and transfers control of Rome to the even more despotic Naevius Sutorius Macro.

Sejanus is executed along with his children; Claudius survives despite being married to Sejanus' sister, whom he quickly divorces.

Livilla is locked in a room by her mother Antonia and starved to death, and Antonia punishes herself for having raised Livilla by listening to her daughter die.

On his deathbed, the old and feeble Tiberius is smothered to death by Macro. Caligula is declared emperor and at first appears to be enlightened and kind.

To his surprise, Claudius is recalled to Rome from his peaceful life in Capua writing history and living with his prostitute companion Calpurnia.

Claudius quickly becomes the butt of many taunts and practical jokes by the Imperial Court. After recovering from a severe illness, Caligula descends into madness, his behavior becoming ever more egomaniacal and irrational.

He declares himself a god in human disguise, stages arguments and battles with other gods, bankrupts the country, and kills thousands. The madness having reached a tempest is finally quelled by Cassius Chaerea , a captain of the Praetorian Guard who plots with the other captains to assassinate Caligula, along with his wife and daughter.

Horrified, Claudius hides behind a curtain and is discovered by a disgruntled Praetorian Guard. Realizing they need a new emperor, the Guards suddenly and bemusedly declare Claudius emperor.

Claudius pleads that he does not want to be emperor and only wants to see the Republic restored, but the Guards ignore him. He sadly accepts for the sake of his wife and unborn child, and for the access the emperorship will give him to valuable historical documents, on a whim deciding that as emperor he will finally be able to demand that people read his books.

The story begins with an apology by Claudius for having ended his first history on a dramatic point and continues with a brief history of his friend Herod Agrippa.

Herod was a schoolmate of Claudius and was liked by Claudius' mother Antonia. Herod always finds himself in debts and danger in the East and in Rome.

He eventually gains the favour of Caligula and is made King of Bashan. Herod is in Rome when Caligula is assassinated and quickly is able to convince Claudius to accept the emperorship in order to avoid civil war.

Claudius reluctantly executes Cassius Chaerea and several of the other assassins and begins tirelessly working for the sake of Rome.

He applies himself to the law courts, demonstrates his intelligence in being able to locate one of Augustus' lost Eagles , and orders the building of a harbour in Ostia to help preserve the Roman food supply.

Claudius is also able to quell two mutinies and conquers Britain. Herod Agrippa conspires to take over the East, as he regards himself as the Messiah.

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

1 thoughts on “I Claudius

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.